Facebook, living and community

apps blur button close up
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

About a week ago, I deleted my Facebook account.

I didn’t deactivate it. I deleted it. (The decision came after report Facebook was sharing contents of users’ private messages with outside companies — a privacy breach too far fo me.) Which means, in a few weeks, I’ll forever lose access to  a dozen years of posts, comments, photos and — most importantly — my sole means of contact to many friends and acquaintances.

I haven’t missed it much. In fact, I’ve finished two novels that I’ve been reading forever, and I don’t think that’s a coincidence. It’s not just that Facebook filled in the corners of my free time; I’d fallen into a spiral where it was easy for me to jump between Facebook and Twitter for an entire evening, screwing around for no good reason. My brain couldn’t slow down enough for a novel.

The problem, of course, is that I still have a blog — hi everyone! — to promote, as well a various other things I write. Facebook can be helpful with promoting and distribution of written ideas and opinion.

So, a question for you: How can we develop a 606 community without necessarily being reliant on Facebook for distribution?

Mennonites, in my experience, are all about developing sustainable paths. The same should be true of our online lives, as well.

 

 

 

Author: joeldermole

Joel Mathis is a freelance writer who lives in Lawrence, Kansas with his wife and son. He spent nine years as a syndicated columnist, co-writing the RedBlueAmerica column as the liberal half of a point-counterpoint duo. His honors include awards for best online commentary from the Online News Association and (twice) from the City and Regional Magazine Association.

One thought on “Facebook, living and community”

  1. I keep track of your blog on my feedly app so I will most certainly still see it, but I’m wondering the same thing, as my blog has a much smaller following than yours and most people don’t see it unless I also post to facebook/instagram.

    Like

Leave a Reply to Bev Regier Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s